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dc.contributor.authorAhilan, Sangaralingam
dc.contributor.otherGuan, Mingfu
dc.contributor.otherWright, Nigel
dc.contributor.otherSleigh, Andrew
dc.contributor.otherAllen, Deonie
dc.contributor.otherArthur, Scott
dc.contributor.otherHaynes, Heather
dc.contributor.otherKrivtsov, Vladimir
dc.coverage.spatialOuseburn catchment in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.en_UK
dc.coverage.temporalRainfall data: 1984 - 2015en_UK
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-14T11:18:43Z
dc.date.available2019-02-14T11:18:43Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-14
dc.identifier.urihttps://rdmc.nottingham.ac.uk/handle/internal/6180
dc.description.abstractThe influence of long-term suspended sediment dynamics on stormwater pond performance is not negligible, but often neglected in pond design and performance evaluation. This paper provides systematic simulated quantification of long-term suspended sedimentological effects on stormwater pond performance. Integrated hydrological and two-dimensional hydro-morphodynamic modelling and simulations were carried out over a 32-year-period (1984-2015) covering 3896 rainfall events with a wide range of rainfall volumes, durations and intensities. Three event-based hypothetical rainfall scenarios; non-flood condition (5-year), sewer design condition (30-year), and river flood condition (100-year) rainfall events with 1-hr duration were also simulated for comparison between the traditional event-based approach and the novel approach presented in this study. Simulation results show that the flood peak attenuation and delay are more pronounced for small (< 5-year) and medium (< 30-year) flood events. The long-term continuous simulation results indicate that the pond provides positive annual trap efficiencies varying from 2% to 69% for 31 of 32 years, providing long term water quality benefits downstream. However, rainfall events in year 2012 flushed out the accumulated sedimentation as a shock load to the downstream river, leading to a negative trap efficiency of -11%. The spatially averaged sediment deposition rate, as predicted by the model, varies with a mean of 2 (1.34) cm/year over the study period, which resulted in a 24% loss in the pond’s volume over 32 years. The impacts of the loss in storage on pond flood attenuation capacity are explored at regular time intervals over the study period. The results indicate that reduction in the pond’s flood attenuation capacity is relatively more pronounced for medium (30-year) and extreme (100-year) flood events than the frequent small flood (5- year) events. The variation in annual sediment loading with rainfall quantities and patterns are also explored.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherThe University of Nottinghamen_UK
dc.relation.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022169419301350?via%3Dihuben_UK
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2019.02.002en_UK
dc.subject.lcshUrban runoff -- Managementen_UK
dc.subject.lcshSedimentation and depositionen_UK
dc.titleModelling the long-term suspended sedimentological effects on stormwater pond performance in an urban catchmenten_UK
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi.org/10.17639/nott.6173
dc.subject.freeStormwater ponds, Long-term performance; Urbanisation; Flood resilience; Sediment dynamics, Hydro-morphodynamic modellingen_UK
dc.subject.jacsEngineering::Civil engineering::Environmental engineeringen_UK
dc.subject.lcT Technology::TC Hydraulic engineering. Ocean engineeringen_UK
dc.date.collectionRainfall data: 01/01/1984 – 14/03/2015. No_Pond_DEM_1m: Year 2000. Pond_DEM_1m_1m: Year 2015.en_UK
dc.coverage.coordinatesPond coordinates: 55.024948, -1.650234en_UK
uon.divisionUniversity of Nottingham, UK Campus::Faculty of Social Sciences::School of Geographyen_UK
uon.funder.controlledEngineering & Physical Sciences Research Councilen_UK
uon.datatype1. A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) before and after building the stormwater pond, 1m × 1m resolution. 2. Historical rainfall at 15 minutes interval at the Jesmond Dene gauging station. 3. Flow hydrographs for three return-periods (5-year, 30-year, 100-year).en_UK
uon.grantEP/K013661/1en_UK
uon.grantEP/P004318/1en_UK
uon.parentprojectBlue-Green Cities Research Project; Urban Flood Resilience Research Projecten_UK
uon.collectionmethodDEM and rainfall: obtained from the Environmental Agency. DEM – Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR): obtained from the Environmental Agency.en_UK
uon.rightscontactUniversity of Exeteren_UK


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